Penalty-Free Food Safety Super Bowl Party

Making party plans for the big football game?  By following simple food safety rules from our game-winning playbook, you’ll provide the best defense to avoid letting your teammates get sacked by foodborne illness this Super Bowl. You may also get voted as MVP for best Super Bowl party host!

Food Safety Tips

Food illness has many causes. Primarily because of leaving food out too long. But, food illness generally occurs when people eat food  that contains bacteria, parasites, viruses, or toxins. Most cases are caused by common bacteria such as staphylococcus or E. coli.

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Clean

  • Begin your party food prep by washing hands with warm, soapy water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Wash and sanitize dishware and utensils before using them to prepare, warm, cook or serve any foods.

Separate

  • Don’t cross-contaminate your food.
    • Keep all raw meat and poultry away from ready to eat foods while preparing and mixing items.
    • Use clean and different utensils for each dish, and avoid using your own personal utensil to serve yourself foods from the buffet.

Cook Properly

Use a food thermometer to ensure that all meats, poultry and other cooked food items have been cooked to a safe internal temperature before serving. Any previously cooked foods being reheated must be reheated to a safe internal temperature of 165°F, or steaming hot before serving.

Making sure food items are properly heated and cooked will kill bacteria that may try to tackle your guests. Refer to the Safe Minimum Cooking Temperatures chart below for the “rest time” of meats—the period after cooking that some meats need to rest before serving to ensure that germs are killed.

Here are the recommended internal temperatures for some Super Bowl party favorites:

Category Food Temperature (°F)  Rest Time 
Ground Meat & Meat Mixtures Beef, Pork, Veal, Lamb 160 None
Turkey, Chicken 165 None
Fresh Beef, Veal, Lamb Steaks, roasts, chops 145 3 minutes
Poultry Chicken & Turkey, whole 165 None
Poultry breasts, roasts 165 None
Poultry thighs, legs, wings 165 None
Duck & Goose 165 None
Stuffing (cooked alone or in bird) 165 None
Pork and Ham Fresh pork 145 3 minutes
Fresh ham (raw) 145 3 minutes
Precooked ham (to reheat) 140 None
Eggs & Egg Dishes Eggs Cook until yolks and
white are firm
None
Egg dishes 160 None
Leftovers & Casseroles Leftovers 165 None
Casseroles 165 None
Seafood Fin Fish 145 or cook until flesh is opaque and separates easily with a fork. None
Shrimp, lobster, and crabs Cook until flesh is pearly and opaque. None
Clams, oysters, and mussels Cook until shells open during cooking. None
Scallops Cook until flesh is milky white or opaque and firm. None

Watch the Time – Leftovers

The game is over, but that doesn’t mean you have to lose your food or your health!  Track the time that food stays on the buffet. Sideline any perishable foods that have been out at room temperature for 2 hours or more.

After foods have been sitting at room temperature for 2 hours, either place foods in the refrigerator, change the cold sources or throw out foods you know have been sitting since pre-game coverage.

  • Bacteria love temperatures between 40°F and 140°F, and will grow rapidly if they are in this temperature environment for more than 2 hours. Read more about the Danger Zone.
  • Divide leftovers into smaller portions or pieces, place in shallow containers, and refrigerate.
  • Leftover foods should be refrigerated at 40°F or below as soon as possible and within two hours of preparation. It’s OK to put hot foods directly into the refrigerator.
  • Refrigerate leftovers for three to four days at most. Freeze them if you won’t be eating the leftovers sooner.
  • Leftovers should be reheated to at least 165°F (74°C) before serving.

Additional Resources

USDA Radio Interviews

YouTube videos

Infographics

 

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